Sixth-form Preparation Work for Year 11

Sixth-form Preparation Work for Year 11

After GCSEs, you might like to get ahead: if you are intending to start either A Level or IB in the sixth form at in September, the following independent study tasks will give you a really strong foundation for the start of year 12.

SubjectA LevelIB
Extended Project and Extended EssayWith all other subjects, the more students can read up and around the topics the better. This will give them a clear head start as they embark on the Y12 courses. With the EPQ, some students will already have an idea of a topic will begin researching it. However, be careful not to become fixed on an idea, focussed on just one path, and find it difficult to deviate in any way when we start in September. Keep an open mind and read widely around the subject.

The EPQ is more than just writing an excellent essay. It is about recording the study journey, starting off with several ideas, narrowing them down, exploring avenues, writing about thought processes and so on. If the students start too soon they will not know to include all of this information and so when they begin the course, they will not have any real thought process to refer to.

However, what you can do in terms of preparation is complete the following MOOC, an online step-by-step course on developing a research project for EPQ.


The Extended Essay invites IB students to develop an independent enquiry into a subject and topic of their choice beyond the confines of the taught curriculum.

Students may well already have an idea of a topic and can begin researching it. However, be careful not to become fixed on an idea, focussed on just one path, and find it difficult to deviate in any way when we start in September. Keep an open mind and read widely around the subject.

Some excellent preparation can be had by completing the following MOOC, an online step-by-step course on developing a research project for the IB EE.


EnglishAs William Shakespeare once said, “Pleasure and action make the hours seem short”, and a really positive way to fill your time over the coming months is to focus on the future, and your studies next year are something to be truly excited about. The books we will start with are as follows. Detailed here are links to the editions we will use in class and in the final exams (no more closed book!); it makes sense to try and get these copies now, if you can, as you will be working from them throughout the course. However, if you have copies of these novels already in your household, just dive straight in and don’t worry about specific editions until September:






As Orhan Pamuk (one of the writers you will study next year) said, ‘life is beautiful if you are on the road to somewhere’, and a positive thing to do right now is to focus on the future. The IB course is fantastic, and reading ahead is a useful and purposeful way to occupy yourself over the coming months. Here is a selection of texts from the first main unit, plus a couple of later texts that we think will be engaging and worthwhile reading for you right now. You do not need to use specific editions, but the following versions below are very good and are hyperlinked to Amazon:






FrenchKiffe Kiffe Demain is the book we will work through in Y12 for the literature module, whether in Higher or Standard class, this text being part of the exam for Higher exams only though.

The more you read in the Summer, the better it will be in year 12. This book can be found on Amazon but do not buy the English version.

"Kiffe Kiffe Tomorrow is the first novel by Faëza Guène, who was only nineteen when it was published in 2004. The book was embraced and celebrated in France as reflecting the authentic voice of working-class young people, especially those of North-African descent growing up in the rundown suburban housing projects outside of Paris. Guène, the daughter of Algerian immigrants, grew up in the suburb of Bobigny, very close to Livry-Gargan, the location of the fictional Paradise estate where Doria, the protagonist of the novel, lives. The language of the original French text, Kiffe Kiffe Demain, makes heavy use of contemporary French slang."
GermanThere are many resources on MS Teams (to gain access please email Miss A Roberts, aroberts@tbgs.torbay.sch.uk)
In addition:

Consolidate grammar, using websites like
Get familiar with all the learning opportunities on the Deutsche Welle dw.de website
Try to learn the German a)states
b) capital cities
c) important cities
(and use the same site to find out things about Austria and Switzerland)
You could also research a topic concerning Germany, Austria and or Switzerland. Your topic should have a specific focus of interest for you, such as:
• film and literature;
• sport;
• music;
• science;
• art;
• place/travel/tourism;
• festival/tradition;
• history/politics.
JapaneseWelcome to IB Japanese! The single most important thing you can do to prepare is to learn how to read and write the Japanese script. You can easily do this between now and the start of term, doing a little each day. The faster you learn to read and write, the better you will be able to access the course once we get started.
For the recognition of hiragana and katakana: use Duolingo’s Tiny Cards


For general work with both the script and a beginners’ course, I have signed you all up to We will also use this once you have started the course in September.

The course code for our new class is 72K5GJ. Your username is FirstnameSurname (with capital letters on both names); your password is your firstname (lowercase). Please change this once you have logged in. Only the 17 people registered to do the IB Japanese Ab Initio course from Sept. 2020 will have access to this Japanese course.

For any problems, please contact Mrs Allen vallen@tbgs.torbay.sch.uk I look forward to seeing you all soon!
SpanishHL/SL
Materials can be accessed through Teams
• Read the 5 short stories;
• Higher level should also read the book;
• Complete activities - grammar booklet;
• Extra: Read news in Spanish .
Please contact Head of Spanish: Mrs M G Foster mfoster@tbgs.torbay.sch.uk to gain access to the materials in Teams.

Ab Initio
Introduction to Spanish grammar:
Complete the following grammar and vocabulary notes in an exercise book, as you go along, so that you can refer back to it when you need it next year.
• The basics: pronouns, verbs, nouns, adjectives, abbreviations, time;
• Common tenses: present, preterite, imperfect, preterite vs imperfect, future;
• Important verbs: to be “ser” & “estar”, to like “gustar”, to have “tener”;
• Extra grammar: articles, negatives, nouns, asking questions, adjectives, adverbs, conjunctions, pronouns, by, with, from, of, verbs, comparisons.

Vocabulary
• www.quizlet.com
• www.memrise.com (choose Spanish AQA Viva modules)
EconomicsRead the news daily especially the impact of the pandemic on firms and individuals. Look at policies being implemented by the UK and other governments.

Watch:
-the Big Short (at least twice)
-The Social Network
-Margin Call
-The Rogue trader

Subscribe to the Economist - you are entitled to 5 free articles a week.
Read the news daily especially the impact of the pandemic on firms and individuals. Look at policies being implemented by the UK and other governments.

Watch:
-the Big Short ( at least twice )
-The Social Network
-Margin Call
-The Rogue trader

Subscribe to the Economist - you are entitled to 5 free articles a week.
Business StudiesRead the news about how businesses and individuals are coping with the pandemic. Look at how business models have changed in terms of more technology being involved. Look at the impact on cash flows especially airlines, holiday firms, hotels and restaurants.

Watch:
-Click at BBC
-Dragons Den
-Apprentice
-The Social Network
Global PoliticsStudents will be studying a wide variety of concepts of Global Politics but a useful starting point in preparation for the course would be to read:
• Prisoners of Geography: Tim Marshall
• Global Politics: Andrew Heywood
• IB Global Politics Course Book: Oxford IB Diploma Programme: Max Kirsch
GeographyWatch some or all of the following:
• Simon Reeve series (Capricorn, Equator, The Americas etc.)
• Race across the World (Series 2 currently on BBC Sunday nights at 8pm I think). You might also be able to watch Series 1.
And then a couple of good books to read, both very interesting and since they are non-fiction books, you can just dip in and out of them.
• Prisoners of Geography (Tim Marshall)
• Factfullness (Hans Rosling)
Finally, collect any useful coronavirus articles (since we cover disease spread).

Check out the Young Geographer of the Year competition:
Watch some or all of the following:
• Simon Reeve series (Capricorn, Equator, The Americas etc.)
• Race across the World (Series 2 currently on BBC Sunday nights at 8pm I think). You might also be able to watch Series 1.
And then a couple of good books to read, both very interesting and since they are non-fiction books, you can just dip in and out of them.
• Prisoners of Geography (Tim Marshall)
• Factfullness (Hans Rosling)
Finally, collect any useful coronavirus articles (since we cover disease spread).

Check out the Young Geographer of the Year competition:
HistoryStudents will be studying a Russian Depth Study and a Breadth Study covering the Tudors, therefore you need to buy the following textbooks:
• Oxford AQA History for A Level – Revolution and Dictatorship: Russia 1917-1953
• Oxford AQA History for A Level – The Tudors: England 1485-1603
To extend your understanding, you can also read the following academic texts:
• Tudor England (John Guy)
• A People's Tragedy: The Russian Revolution (Orlando Figes)

Students will be studying Authoritarian States and Global Wars, therefore it would be useful for you to complete background reading on:
Russia
• The Penguin History of Modern Russia: From Tsarism to the Twenty-First Century (Robert Service)
• A People's Tragedy: the Russian Revolution (Orlando Figes)
Global War
• The Sleepwalkers: How Europe went to war in 1914 (Christopher Clark)
• Origins of the Second World War (AJP Taylor)
Ancient HistoryStudents will be studying Greece in Year 12 and so should start reading the following texts:
• The Histories (Herodotus)
• The Peloponnesian War (Thucydides)
PhilosophyWe have discovered an opportunity to complete a free 10-week online Philosophy course run by the Royal Institute of Philosophy. To secure a place email glenn@philosophyforchildren.com including age and school

General introductions to Philosophy that can gently immerse you in the subject include…
Will Buckingham – The Philosophy Book
Stephen Law – The Philosophy Gym
Twenty Questions: An introduction to Philosophy – G. Bowie
Nigel Warburton - A Little History of Philosophy
Nigel Warburton - Philosophy: The Essential Study Guide
Jennifer Nagel - Knowledge: A Very Short Introduction
Thomas Nagel - What Does It All Mean?
Robert Martin - Epistemology: A Beginner's Guide
Peter Singer - Practical Ethics
Brian Rogers - Perception: A Very Short Introduction
Robert Persig - Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance
…And this one comes highly recommended by Dr Dimmock:
Mark Dimmock & Andrew Fisher – Ethics for A-level (free online version)
These two textbooks will be useful in supporting your learning (they tie in closely to our AQA specification):
Hayward, Jones, Cardinal (Hodder) – Philosophy Paper 1: Epistemology and Moral Philosophy
Hayward, Jones, Cardinal (Hodder) – Philosophy Paper 2: Metaphysics of God and metaphysics of mind
If you are feeling really daring then try reading:
Descartes - Meditations of First Philosophy [Meditations 1, 2, 3, 5, 6] – (free online and his thinking connects most of the course)
John Stuart Mill - Utilitarianism [Chapters 1, 2, 4, 5]
Watch the following movies and see what philosophical themes you can identify within them? (Arguably, philosophy can be found in most films):
The Matrix, Inception, Blade Runner, The Truman Show, Her, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. The Good Place and Black Mirror are full of course-related themes and Star Trek episodes are often rich in philosophical content (or so Dr Dimmock claims)
We have discovered an opportunity to complete a free 10-week online Philosophy course run by the Royal Institute of Philosophy. To secure a place email glenn@philosophyforchildren.com including age and school

We’ve got plenty of reading and movie recommendations to help prepare you for our philosophical studies next year…
You could start off with one or more of these introductory texts:
Will Buckingham – The Philosophy Book
Stephen Law – The Philosophy Gym
Twenty Questions: An introduction to Philosophy – G. Bowie
Nigel Warburton - A Little History of Philosophy
Nigel Warburton - Philosophy: The Essential Study Guide
Jennifer Nagel - Knowledge: A Very Short Introduction
Thomas Nagel - What Does It All Mean?
Robert Persig - Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance
These are by no means compulsory reading but rather a fun way to start engaging in the subject at a higher level.
…And this one comes highly recommended by Dr Dimmock:
Mark Dimmock & Andrew Fisher – Ethics for A-level (free online version)
Our prescribed text is:
Plato – The Republic (if you want to dip your toe in then buy the Penguin edition with the translation by Desmond Lee)
Watch the following movies and see what philosophical themes you can identify within them? (Arguably, philosophy can be found in most films):
The Matrix, Inception, Blade Runner, The Truman Show, Her, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
The Good Place and Black Mirror are full of course-related themes .Dr Dimmock recommends a strong dose of Star Trek episodes!

BiologyAs well as ensuring you have finished all of the content of your GCSE Biology course, preparing for Biology in the sixth form is similar for A Level and IB. In class we use the Oxford A level and IB textbooks (A level students will have online access to the Oxford textbook via Kerboodle), and we would always recommend using another textbook as different books have different styles which suit different students. Below are the ones we use personally in the department, but good old CGP also produces some really good A level revision guides to give you a flavour of what to expect.






The units we start with at A level and IB are also similar, and so to get a head start, we would recommend that you review all of your GCSE microscopes, cells, cell cycle, cell division, stem cells and specialised cells content. We also cover biochemistry at the start of year 12 which many students find tricky as we don’t cover it at GCSE. The bioninja website has a great intro to biological molecules which can be used by A level and IB students:

Finally, we have provided a transition to A level booklet which can be completed by anyone joining us in the sixth form, as well as the 2019 GCSE past papers (previous years can be found on the AQA website).

Transition Questions MS

Transition Questions Student

This is also a great time just to read around the wonderful world of Biology – the current Bill Bryson book is a great overview of human biology.

As well as ensuring you have finished all of the content of your GCSE Biology course, preparing for Biology in the sixth form is similar for A Level and IB. In class we use the Oxford A level and IB textbooks (A level students will have online access to the Oxford textbook via Kerboodle), and we would always recommend using another textbook as different books have different styles which suit different students. Below are the ones we use personally in the department, but good old CGP also produces some really good A level revision guides to give you a flavour of what to expect.






The units we start with at A level and IB are also similar, and so to get a head start, we would recommend that you review all of your GCSE microscopes, cells, cell cycle, cell division, stem cells and specialised cells content. We also cover biochemistry at the start of year 12 which many students find tricky as we don’t cover it at GCSE. The bioninja website has a great intro to biological molecules which can be used by A level and IB students:

Finally, we have provided a transition to A level booklet which can be completed by anyone joining us in the sixth form, as well as the 2019 GCSE past papers (previous years can be found on the AQA website).

Transition Questions MS

Transition Questions Student


This is also a great time just to read around the wonderful world of Biology – the current Bill Bryson book is a great overview of human biology.

ChemistryThe increase in demand from GCSE Chemistry to A Level Chemistry is significant and it is wise to ensure that key GCSE topics are securely understood – especially in this year when students have not completed revision for GCSE.

These preparation tasks have been divided into three blocks of work for your convenience. You might like to take a week or two for each section and are advised to complete the work by the end of May.

The CGP Book ‘Head Start to A Level Chemistry’ is recommended. This is a revision guide that covers key GCSE topics and also links this revision to content that you would first encounter in A Level Chemistry. A paper copy can be ordered online for £4.95, but it is currently available free-of-charge as an e-book on Amazon Kindle. The Kindle app is available for any mobile device. Please note that this e-book cannot be read on the web browser Kindle website.

Broadly speaking, AQA GCSE topics 1-6 are the most important for A Level preparation. So AQA Paper 1 and Rates & Equilibria from Paper 2 are useful. The GCSE past papers can therefore be used.

Current students have access to lots of GCSE practice packs on itslearning and Kerboodle. The tasks below, however, recommend content that is freely available to anyone.

Some students may wish to purchase and use textbooks for sixth form now. This is not required until September. However, at A Level we use OUP A Level Chemistry for OCR A by Ritchie & Gent.

Please contact your Chemistry teacher for support and, if an external applicant to you are welcome to contact Dr Marr (Head of Chemistry) at smarr@tbgs.torbay.sch.uk

10-Things-to-do-to-Prepare-for-A-Level-Chem

Block 1 – Atomic Structure and Chemical Bonding
1. CGP Head Start to A Level Chemistry: study sections 1 and 4, completing the questions at the bottom of each page. Most work is revision but you will find that the Electronic Structure (p4) takes you in an interesting new direction.
a. Access (atomic properties) to support this study. Excellent website.
b. This is a recording of a live introductory A-Level lesson on this topic on SnapRevise:
2. Practise relevant GCSE questions on Atomic Structure and Structure and Bonding from ‘Maths Made Easy’ website.
3. Extension for those who want to get further ahead: Study formation of ions and intermolecular bonding in more depth – Head Start to A Level Chemistry sections 2 and 3. www.chemguide.co.uk is one of many websites that would provide support here.

Block 2 – Quantitative Chemistry
1. Revise GCSE Higher Level Calculations:
Access for tutorials and a test.
provides short video lessons
2. Practise relevant GCSE questions on Chemical Calculations from ‘Maths Made Easy’ website.
3. Chemical Formulae: writing these is an essential skill. These websites will lead you through the ideas and there are a couple of little tests included. The first two are aimed at GCSE and the third, Khan Academy is aimed at sixth form ionic formulae so you get to work with some unfamiliar ions and includes practice.
a.
b.
c.
4. CGP Head Start to A Level Chemistry: study sections 5 and 11, completing the questions at the bottom of each page. Some work is revision but you will find that there are new calculation types to challenge and interest you. Useful Powerpoint on Mole Calculations can be found here:

Block 3 – Rates, Equilibria and Energy
1. CGP Head Start to A Level Chemistry: study sections 9, 10 and 12, completing the questions at the bottoms of each page. Most work is revision. Access to support this study.
2. Practise relevant GCSE questions on Rates of Reaction, Energy Changes and Using Resources: Haber Process from ‘Maths Made Easy’ website.
3. Extension for those who want to get further ahead: Study the significance of the Boltzmann Distribution and the Arrhenius Equation. is one of many websites that would provide support here.


The increase in demand from GCSE Chemistry to IB Chemistry is significant and it is wise to ensure that key GCSE topics are securely understood – especially in this year when students have not completed revision for GCSE.

These preparation tasks have been divided into three blocks of work for your convenience. You might like to take a week or two for each section and are advised to complete the work by the end of May.

The CGP Book ‘Head Start to A Level Chemistry’ is recommended. This is a revision guide that covers key GCSE topics and also links this revision to content that you would first encounter in IB Chemistry. A paper copy can be ordered online for £4.95, but it is currently available free-of-charge as an e-book on Amazon Kindle. The Kindle app is available for any mobile device. Please note that this e-book cannot be read on the web browser Kindle website.

Broadly speaking, AQA GCSE topics 1-6 are the most important for IB preparation. So AQA Paper 1 and Rates & Equilibria from Paper 2 are useful. The GCSE past papers can therefore be used.

Current students have access to lots of GCSE practice packs on itslearning and Kerboodle. The tasks below, however, recommend content that is freely available to anyone.

Some students may wish to purchase and use textbooks for sixth form now. This is not required until September. However, at IB we use Pearson Baccalaureate Higher Level Chemistry/Standard Level Chemistry by Brown & Ford.

Please contact your Chemistry teacher for support and, if an external applicant to you are welcome to contact Dr Marr (Head of Chemistry) at smarr@tbgs.torbay.sch.uk

10-Things-to-do-to-Prepare-for-A-Level-Chem

Block 1 – Atomic Structure and Chemical Bonding
1. CGP Head Start to A Level Chemistry: study sections 1 and 4, completing the questions at the bottom of each page. Most work is revision but you will find that the Electronic Structure (p4) takes you in an interesting new direction.
a. Access (atomic properties) to support this study. Excellent website.
b. This is a recording of a live introductory A Level lesson on this topic on SnapRevise:
2. Practise relevant GCSE questions on Atomic Structure and Structure and Bonding from ‘Maths Made Easy’ website.
3. Extension for those who want to get further ahead: Study formation of ions and intermolecular bonding in more depth – Head Start to A Level Chemistry sections 2 and 3. www.chemguide.co.uk is one of many websites that would provide support here.

Block 2 – Quantitative Chemistry
1. Revise GCSE Higher Level Calculations:
Access for tutorials and a test.
provides short video lessons
2. Practise relevant GCSE questions on Chemical Calculations from ‘Maths Made Easy’ website.
3. Chemical Formulae: writing these is an essential skill. These websites will lead you through the ideas and there are a couple of little tests included. The first two are aimed at GCSE and the third, Khan Academy is aimed at sixth form ionic formulae so you get to work with some unfamiliar ions and includes practice.
a.
b.
c.
4. CGP Head Start to A Level Chemistry: study sections 5 and 11, completing the questions at the bottom of each page. Some work is revision but you will find that there are new calculation types to challenge and interest you. Useful Powerpoint on Mole Calculations can be found here:

Block 3 – Rates, Equilibria and Energy
1. CGP Head Start to A Level Chemistry: study sections 9, 10 and 12, completing the questions at the bottoms of each page. Most work is revision. Access to support this study.
2. Practise relevant GCSE questions on Rates of Reaction, Energy Changes and Using Resources: Haber Process from ‘Maths Made Easy’ website.
3. Extension for those who want to get further ahead: Study the significance of the Boltzmann Distribution and the Arrhenius Equation. is one of many websites that would provide support here.

PhysicsThe study of physics at A level broadly follows the same subject content as at GCSE, but develops the understanding of phenomena by using more mathematical techniques and by practical work. You should ensure that you have a good understanding of all these topics by completing your GCSE studies fully and reviewing them before you start the A-level course in September.

For the study of A level Physics, you should purchase the , by (Contributor), (Author), (Author) This covers the 2 year course comprehensively and we use this in class.

For preparatory work, you should complete the GCSE to A-level transition document and then mark it. This will give you an idea of the sorts of problems you must be familiar with to succeed at A level, and also includes some website that can help you with content.

Physics GCSE to A level or IB Transition work NO ANSWERS

GCSE to A level and IB transition work ANSWERS

A great way to become familiar with some of the practical skills you need to develop is to complete the practical task, a home experiment that allows you to ‘weigh’ the earth. See how you get on!

GCSE to A level transition Practical Physics

10-Things-to-Do-to-Prepare-for-A-Level-Physics
The study of physics at IB (SL and HL) broadly follows the same subject content as at GCSE, but develops the understanding of phenomena by using more mathematical techniques and by practical work. You should ensure that you have a good understanding of all these topics by completing your GCSE studies fully and reviewing them before you start the course in September.

For the IB course, students should purchase the relevant course book (Standard or Higher). There are two good options, the Pearson, or the slightly better Oxford publication, but either matches the course well.
Pearson Baccalaureate Physics Standard Level 2nd edition print for the IB Diploma (Pearson International Baccalaureate Diploma: International Editions) Paperback by (Author)
Pearson Baccalaureate: Higher Level Physics for the IB Diploma (Pearson International Baccalaureate Diploma: International Editions) Paperback by (Author)
: (Oxford IB Diploma Programme 2014 Edition) By (Author), (Author)
For preparatory work, you should complete the GCSE to A level transition document and then mark it. This will give you an idea of the sorts of problems you must be familiar with to succeed at A level, and also includes some website that can help you with content.

Physics GCSE to A level or IB Transition work NO ANSWERS

GCSE to A level and IB transition work ANSWERS


A great way to become familiar with some of the practical skills, you need to develop to work on the Internal Assessment, is to complete the practical task, a home experiment that allows you to ‘weigh’ the earth. See how you get on!

GCSE to A level transition Practical Physics

10-Things-to-Do-to-Prepare-for-A-Level-Physics
Computer ScienceFor the A-level, you will use C# language.

If you have Visual Studio at home, you can learn C# by working through the tasks in the Programming in C# folder. Worksheets are available through It’s Learning/Teams/SharePoint.

If not, you need to work through the course "Learn C#" on . Use your school email address to log into . As you are planning to study A-level computer science, you should download Visual Studio, which is free to students, as you will need it for the A-level Computer Science course.

Computer Science GCSE to A-Level Material
MathematicsThe A-level course starts by assuming that you understand a number of key techniques which you encountered when studying GCSE Mathematics. You need to be fluent in manipulating numbers, certain algebraic techniques and some shape and space techniques.

In the past, many students have encountered difficulties with the transition between GCSE and A-level Mathematics. To avoid these difficulties, it is imperative that you are fluent in the required skills before starting the course in September. There will be an assessment test during the first fortnight of the course to ensure all students are at the required level.

The following My Maths lessons and Booster Packs cover the key skills expected of a student studying Mathematics beyond GCSE. You will need to log in to MyMaths and then copy the following links from the document below, pasting them into the address bar. At the end of the list of topics there are links to other useful websites and some books you may consider getting.

If you require the school logon details for , please contact Mr C Price, cprice@tbgs.torbay.sch.uk

My Maths sixth form prep lessons

For short, sharp reminders, these lessons and online worksheets in the Booster Packs provide good practice of some basic skills.

• Go to Booster Packs: Grades 6 and 7 and work through the lessons and online worksheets for Expressions, Inequalities, Sequences and Formula, Simultaneous Equations, Graphs, Pythagoras and Trig.
• Go to Booster Packs: Grades 8 and 9 and work through the lessons and online worksheets on Quadratics and Number.
Dr Frost Maths contains a suite of “Full Coverage Revision Worksheets” and these can be used to revise the topics listed above.

CIMT provide resources to assist with the transition between GCSE and sixth-form Mathematics.


More resources which have been written specifically for the students at :


• Collins Bridging GCSE and A Level Maths: Student book, ISBN 9780008205010
The following is a list of other topics you would benefit from revising, but may not necessarily be in the assessment test.

Number and algebra
• Rounding, decimal approximations and significant figures, including appreciation of errors
• Use of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division using integers, decimals and fractions, including order of operations
• Prime numbers, factors (divisors) and multiples
• Greatest common factor (divisor) and least common multiples (HL IB only)
• Simple applications of ratio, percentage and proportion
• Calculating the numerical value of expressions by substitution
• Familiarity with commonly accepted world currencies
Geometry and trigonometry
• Geometric concepts: point, line, plane, angle
• Angle measurement in degrees, compass directions
• Simple geometric transformations: translation, reflection, rotation, enlargement
• The circle, its centre and radius, area and circumference. The terms diameter, arc, sector, chord, tangent and segment
• Perimeter and area of plane figures. Properties of triangles and quadrilaterals, including parallelograms, rhombuses, rectangles, squares, kites and trapezoids; compound shapes
• Familiarity with three-dimensional shapes (prisms, pyramids, spheres, cylinders and cones)
• Volumes and surface areas of cuboids, prisms, cylinders, and compound 3-d shapes
Statistics and probability
• The collection of data and its representation in bar charts, pie charts, pictograms, line graphs
• Obtaining simple statistics from discrete data, including mean, median, mode, range
• Calculating probabilities of simple events
• Venn diagrams for sorting data
• Tree diagrams
Calculus
• Speed = distance/time
The A-level course starts by assuming that you understand a number of key techniques which you encountered when studying GCSE Mathematics. You need to be fluent in manipulating numbers, certain algebraic techniques and some shape and space techniques.

In the past, many students have encountered difficulties with the transition between GCSE and A-level Mathematics. To avoid these difficulties, it is imperative that you are fluent in the required skills before starting the course in September. There will be an assessment test during the first fortnight of the course to ensure all students are at the required level.

The following My Maths lessons and Booster Packs cover the key skills expected of a student studying Mathematics beyond GCSE. You will need to log in to MyMaths and then copy the following links from the document below, pasting them into the address bar. At the end of the list of topics there are links to other useful websites and some books you may consider getting.

If you require the school logon details for , please contact Mr C Price, cprice@tbgs.torbay.sch.uk

My Maths sixth form prep lessons

For short, sharp reminders, these lessons and online worksheets in the Booster Packs provide good practice of some basic skills.

• Go to Booster Packs: Grades 6 and 7 and work through the lessons and online worksheets for Expressions, Inequalities, Sequences and Formula, Simultaneous Equations, Graphs, Pythagoras and Trig.
• Go to Booster Packs: Grades 8 and 9 and work through the lessons and online worksheets on Quadratics and Number.
Dr Frost Maths contains a suite of “Full Coverage Revision Worksheets” and these can be used to revise the topics listed above.

CIMT provide resources to assist with the transition between GCSE and sixth-form Mathematics.


More resources which have been written specifically for the students at :


• Collins Bridging GCSE and A Level Maths: Student book, ISBN 9780008205010
The following is a list of other topics you would benefit from revising, but may not necessarily be in the assessment test.

Number and algebra
• Rounding, decimal approximations and significant figures, including appreciation of errors
• Use of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division using integers, decimals and fractions, including order of operations
• Prime numbers, factors (divisors) and multiples
• Greatest common factor (divisor) and least common multiples (HL IB only)
• Simple applications of ratio, percentage and proportion
• Calculating the numerical value of expressions by substitution
• Familiarity with commonly accepted world currencies
Geometry and trigonometry
• Geometric concepts: point, line, plane, angle
• Angle measurement in degrees, compass directions
• Simple geometric transformations: translation, reflection, rotation, enlargement
• The circle, its centre and radius, area and circumference. The terms diameter, arc, sector, chord, tangent and segment
• Perimeter and area of plane figures. Properties of triangles and quadrilaterals, including parallelograms, rhombuses, rectangles, squares, kites and trapezoids; compound shapes
• Familiarity with three-dimensional shapes (prisms, pyramids, spheres, cylinders and cones)
• Volumes and surface areas of cuboids, prisms, cylinders, and compound 3-d shapes
Statistics and probability
• The collection of data and its representation in bar charts, pie charts, pictograms, line graphs
• Obtaining simple statistics from discrete data, including mean, median, mode, range
• Calculating probabilities of simple events
• Venn diagrams for sorting data
• Tree diagrams
Calculus
• Speed = distance/time
MusicCompose a Theme and Variations
Read the whole of the instructions before you start, then come back and do each section in turn. You could write for piano or for a melody instrument and piano.
1. Compose a 16 bar melody.
It will help to sub-divide your 16 bars into two pairs of 4 bars. Within each pair try to create a ‘question’ and ‘answer.’ Try to end the first 4 bars with notes that would suit an imperfect cadence and the second 4 bars a perfect cadence. Take this approach with the second pair.
2. Work out some chords that will fit your melody (you could compose the chords and melody at the same time – I would)
3. Compose a set of variations on this theme. Each variation should explore different techniques for changing the theme and its harmony.
Each variation will be based on a different musical texture:
1. Unison
2. Homophonic harmony - doubling in 3rds or 6ths
3. Homophonic chords
4. Accompaniment patterns – choose ONE from arpeggios, broken chords, alberti bass, repeated rhythmic chords and stride piano.
5. Melody with Accompaniment – create a more varied accompaniment, combining two or more of the above (e.g. a held chord followed by a couple of bars of alberti bass etc.)
6. Polyphony - canon
7. Polyphony - countermelody.

Within your seven variations you should also explore all of the following:
• Changing the mode (swap major for minor)
• Changing the metre (time signature) and adjusting your theme accordingly.
• Rhythmic alterations (e.g. introducing dotted notes, using triplets)
• Melodic Ornamentation – elaborate the melody, perhaps making hiding it within semiquaver or quaver runs.
• Reharmonisation – changing the harmony, including introducing chromatic chords.
• Transposing some variations into different keys

Remember that composing is an expressive as well as technical exercise. You should think about what mood or atmosphere you want each variation to create, and include detailed dynamic, articulation and tempo markings from the start of the process.

Learn and Practise Reading, Analysing and Annotating Scores
1. Watch these videos on how to identify notes on the stave. Make notes (you can print manuscript paper from the internet).


2. Follow this link to There are a range of lessons and tests on here to help you learn music theory.
For each topic, first watch the lesson from the ‘Lessons’ tab at the top, then go the ‘Exercises’ tab and complete the linked exercise.
Work your way through all of the lessons EXCEPT the final section (Neapolitan chords) and skip ‘odd meter.’
Only skip a step if you are confident that you can read/analyse the concept fluently. For example, if you can read treble clef notes without thinking or needing to work them out, skip that stage.
Be careful though; important concepts pop up in the middle of groups that might seem easy. If in doubt, start then stop if it’s too easy.
3. Watch the video below and take notes on score reading.
4. Complete the C section of this online score reading course up to C10
5. More score reading practice
◦ Single line score video: (first 3 minutes)
◦ Single line score practise: Score: Sarabande Video:
◦ Two line score video (piano): 3:03 – 5:05
◦ Two line score practise (piano): Score: Mozart Video:
◦ String Quartet score video: s – watch first TWO movements (slow and fast).
◦ String Quartet practise: Score: Haydn Recording:
◦ Orchestra score video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xcaUGsL2EpI
◦ Orchestra score practise: Score: Haydn Symphony Recording: First movement only.

Listen (to anything you aren’t familiar with)
Jazz
Maple Leaf Rag
James P Johnson – Charleston
Jelly Roll Morton – Black Bottom Stomp
Duke Ellington – Mood Indigo
Fats Waller – Ain’t Misbehavin’
Parker/Gillespie – Anthropology
Ella Fitzgerald Live in Berlin – How High the Moon
Stan Getz – Stella by Starlight
Miles Davis – Moon Dreams
Thelonious Monk Four in One.
Pop and Rock
The Beatles – Within Without You
Rolling Stones – Satisfaction
The Who – Won’t Get Fooled Again
Martha and the Vandellas – Nowhere to Run
Tammy Wynette: D.I.V.O.R.C.E.
Ike and Tina Turner River Deep Mountain High
The Doors - Light My Fire
Genesis - Supper’s Ready
David Bowie – Heroes
The Clash – London’s Calling
Donna Summer - I Feel Love
The Specials – Ghost Town
Ultravox – Hiroshima mon Amour
Fatboy Slim – Praise You
The Happy Mondays – Step On
The Smiths – This Charming Man
Spiritualized – Ladies and Gentlemen we are Floating in Space.
The Longpigs – Jesus Christ.
Musical Theatre
People Will Say We’re in Love from Oklahoma!
The Ballad of Sweeney Todd from Sweeney Todd
Another National Anthem from Assassins
What’s the Buzz from Jesus Christ Superstar
I Dreamed a Dream from Les Miserables
Stranger to the Rain from Children of Eden

Compose a Theme and Variations
Read the whole of the instructions before you start, then come back and do each section in turn. You could write for piano or for a melody instrument and piano.
1. Compose a 16 bar melody.
It will help to sub-divide your 16 bars into two pairs of 4 bars. Within each pair try to create a ‘question’ and ‘answer.’ Try to end the first 4 bars with notes that would suit an imperfect cadence and the second 4 bars a perfect cadence. Take this approach with the second pair.
2. Work out some chords that will fit your melody (you could compose the chords and melody at the same time – I would)
3. Compose a set of variations on this theme. Each variation should explore different techniques for changing the theme and its harmony.
Each variation will be based on a different musical texture:
1. Unison
2. Homophonic harmony - doubling in 3rds or 6ths
3. Homophonic chords
4. Accompaniment patterns – choose ONE from arpeggios, broken chords, alberti bass, repeated rhythmic chords and stride piano.
5. Melody with Accompaniment – create a more varied accompaniment, combining two or more of the above (e.g. a held chord followed by a couple of bars of alberti bass etc.)
6. Polyphony - canon
7. Polyphony - countermelody.

Within your seven variations you should also explore all of the following:
• Changing the mode (swap major for minor)
• Changing the metre (time signature) and adjusting your theme accordingly.
• Rhythmic alterations (e.g. introducing dotted notes, using triplets)
• Melodic Ornamentation – elaborate the melody, perhaps making hiding it within semiquaver or quaver runs.
• Reharmonisation – changing the harmony, including introducing chromatic chords.
• Transposing some variations into different keys

Remember that composing is an expressive as well as technical exercise. You should think about what mood or atmosphere you want each variation to create, and include detailed dynamic, articulation and tempo markings from the start of the process.

Learn and Practise Reading, Analysing and Annotating Scores
1. Watch these videos on how to identify notes on the stave. Make notes (you can print manuscript paper from the internet).


2. Follow this link to There are a range of lessons and tests on here to help you learn music theory.
For each topic, first watch the lesson from the ‘Lessons’ tab at the top, then go the ‘Exercises’ tab and complete the linked exercise.
Work your way through all of the lessons EXCEPT the final section (Neapolitan chords) and skip ‘odd meter.’
Only skip a step if you are confident that you can read/analyse the concept fluently. For example, if you can read treble clef notes without thinking or needing to work them out, skip that stage.
Be careful though; important concepts pop up in the middle of groups that might seem easy. If in doubt, start then stop if it’s too easy.
3. Watch the video below and take notes on score reading.
4. Complete the C section of this online score reading course up to C10
5. More score reading practice
◦ Single line score video: (first 3 minutes)
◦ Single line score practise: Score: Sarabande Video:
◦ Two line score video (piano): 3:03 – 5:05
◦ Two line score practise (piano): Score: Mozart Video:
◦ String Quartet score video: s – watch first TWO movements (slow and fast).
◦ String Quartet practise: Score: Haydn Recording:
◦ Orchestra score video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xcaUGsL2EpI
◦ Orchestra score practise: Score: Haydn Symphony Recording: First movement only.

Listen (to anything you aren’t familiar with)
Jazz
Maple Leaf Rag
James P Johnson – Charleston
Jelly Roll Morton – Black Bottom Stomp
Duke Ellington – Mood Indigo
Fats Waller – Ain’t Misbehavin’
Parker/Gillespie – Anthropology
Ella Fitzgerald Live in Berlin – How High the Moon
Stan Getz – Stella by Starlight
Miles Davis – Moon Dreams
Thelonious Monk Four in One.
Pop and Rock
The Beatles – Within Without You
Rolling Stones – Satisfaction
The Who – Won’t Get Fooled Again
Martha and the Vandellas – Nowhere to Run
Tammy Wynette: D.I.V.O.R.C.E.
Ike and Tina Turner River Deep Mountain High
The Doors - Light My Fire
Genesis - Supper’s Ready
David Bowie – Heroes
The Clash – London’s Calling
Donna Summer - I Feel Love
The Specials – Ghost Town
Ultravox – Hiroshima mon Amour
Fatboy Slim – Praise You
The Happy Mondays – Step On
The Smiths – This Charming Man
Spiritualized – Ladies and Gentlemen we are Floating in Space.
The Longpigs – Jesus Christ.
Musical Theatre
People Will Say We’re in Love from Oklahoma!
The Ballad of Sweeney Todd from Sweeney Todd
Another National Anthem from Assassins
What’s the Buzz from Jesus Christ Superstar
I Dreamed a Dream from Les Miserables
Stranger to the Rain from Children of Eden
ArtStudying Art and Design at A Level will equip you with a set of transferable skills both for life and for a wide range of vocational areas. This course allows you to explore a range of disciplines before deciding which area you want to study at degree level. Studying art and design provides the opportunity to acquire new skills. As well as knowledge of different art forms, media and techniques, you will also gain experience in areas such as photography and digital technologies.

One of the best ways to prepare following on from your GCSE course is to continue to sketch, draw, paint, create art etc. every day. Keep a sketchbook and draw from life as much as you can! Go to ‘virtual’ gallery shows, and try to keep informed about exhibitions etc. on a local, national and international level Research some of your favourite artist/s and start reading books about them.

You will all develop ‘core themes’ for your project work. This will play out in your Personal Investigation at A level. We will start the core theme journey together in September. For now just work with subject matter that you enjoy.

Reading about Art & Design in books as well as on the web and in magazines is an important part of the contextual studies which underlie the development of your practical skills. The project work you will be doing requires an exploration of the influences which inspired how you have approach your chosen topic/theme, and you will need to explain how your own work evolves over time. Artist research and visits to relevant exhibitions and galleries, are all part of reviewing, analysing, and developing your personal interpretations and directions in the creative work you do throughout both of these Art courses.

Most importantly, you should enjoy the process of developing your skills, ideas and understanding, as you progress through the course. Successful students are hungry to improve and diversify their expressive skills, supported by their teacher’s advice and guidance. You will need inspiration, perseverance, good time management, and independent working skills to realise your full creative potential.
Studying Art and Design at IB will equip you with a set of transferable skills both for life and for a wide range of vocational areas. This course allows you to explore a range of disciplines before deciding which area you want to study at degree level. Studying art and design provides the opportunity to acquire new skills. As well as knowledge of different art forms, media and techniques, you will also gain experience in areas such as photography and digital technologies.

One of the best ways to prepare following on from your GCSE course is to continue to sketch, draw, paint, create art etc. every day. Keep a sketchbook and draw from life as much as you can! Go to ‘virtual’ gallery shows, and try to keep informed about exhibitions etc. on a local, national and international level Research some of your favourite artist/s and start reading books about them.

You will all develop ‘core themes’ for your project work. This will play out in your Process Portfolio and Exhibition at IB. We will start the core theme journey together in September. For now just work with subject matter that you enjoy.

Reading about Art & Design in books as well as on the web and in magazines is an important part of the contextual studies which underlie the development of your practical skills. The project work you will be doing requires an exploration of the influences which inspired how you have approach your chosen topic/theme, and you will need to explain how your own work evolves over time. Artist research and visits to relevant exhibitions and galleries, are all part of reviewing, analysing, and developing your personal interpretations and directions in the creative work you do throughout both of these Art courses.

Most importantly, you should enjoy the process of developing your skills, ideas and understanding, as you progress through the course. Successful students are hungry to improve and diversify their expressive skills, supported by their teacher’s advice and guidance. You will need inspiration, perseverance, good time management, and independent working skills to realise your full creative potential.
Media StudiesHow are British newspapers using their front covers to reassure the British public at a time of crisis? (A set media form for A Level) Explore a range of newspaper front covers available in the UK over three days (use the BBC website for these - they post up images of them every day). Gather together examples of the headlines and use of images. You can also use this website to find front covers:

Watch at least one episode of Secrets of Cinema. This is film critic Mark Kermode’s series on popular film genres. Freely available on BBC iPlayer.

Watch the trailers for Series 1 of Stranger Things and Deutschland 83 (set texts for A Level). What genre do they each belong to and what are the clues that reveal this?

Terminology Quizlet

You may wish to purchase the OCR exam board’s course books, although this is not essential:
OCR A Level Media Studies Student Guide 1: Media Messages
OCR A Level Media Studies Student Guide 2: Evolving Media
Design and Technology Specific material has been set up for students via Teams. Any specific questions should be directed to Mr Standford, Head of Technology cstandford@tbgs.torbay.sch.uk
Physical EducationAs we know ‘Proper Preparation Prevents Pretty Poor Performance’. So, in order to prepare for the next chapter of your sporting studies, the following will give you a fast start out of the blocks to get ahead of the game.

1. Scheduled GCSE revision/pre A-level programme

This will continue during your timetabled GCSE PE lessons. The aim of this is to embed all the knowledge acquired over the last 2 years and then begin the process of enhancing this to A-Level standard. This will be delivered through the Teams. Please contact Mr Last, Head of PE, alast@tbgs.torbay.sch.uk.

2. Explore the OCR A-Level PE syllabus.

A Level PE Spec:

A Level PE Coursework elements:

3. Preparation for the A-level PE VERBAL COURSEWORK - Evaluation and Analysis of Performance for Improvement (EAPI)

Part of the syllabus includes a verbal presentation coursework on evaluation and analysis of performance for improvement. This presentation is related to your chosen sporting field, and looks at you observing a performance on a video, or of a live performance, and assessing the performance, in terms of strength and weaknesses related to skills, tactics and fitness.

You then include all of your theory areas as you become 'the coach' and create a training program to improve the performance of the athlete that you have just watched.

During this interim period of Year 11 into Year 12, develop the technical areas of your coursework, focusing on Sports-specific Technical Models, coaching points, correct technique, joint analysis and effects of exercise on the body, through research.

4. Targeted reading around the subject

Performance Enhancing Drugs


Hosting Global Sports Events

Technology In Sport

Sport Psychology
Leadership

Aggression In Sport

The Golden Triangle – Commercialisation and Sport